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INVINCIBLE: SEASON TWO: PART ONE

Starring: Steven Yeun, Sandra Oh, J.K. Simmons, Gillian Jacobs, Andrew Rannells, Walton Goggins, Chris Diamantopoulos, Zazie Beetz, Kevin Michael Richardson, and Sterling K. Brown
Creators: Robert Kirkman, Ryan Ottley, and Cory Walker

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KATIE

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Invincible feels like the perfect antidote to the recent prevalence of superhero fatigue. It’s compelling and bold, with sensationally gory violence, nuanced characters, and genuine emotion driven by a voice cast that brings deeply expressive performances to underscore the provoking themes of trauma and grief. However, it unfortunately suffers as a result of the season being split, losing some momentum and rushing through several subplots that kept getting forgotten, particularly Atom Eve’s (Gillian Jacobs) familial drama and Mark’s (Steven Yeun) relationship. Despite lacking some focus, I’m excited to delve deeper into Mark’s journey in the next half of the season.

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QUENTIN

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I don’t know what Invincible is doing. Season One was mostly made up of filler episodes, with only the premiere and finale being truly necessary to the core narrative. In Season Two: Part One, the series has leaned into that approach even more. There are just four episodes, and you only need Episode Four for Mark’s (Steven Yeun) story. Between the voice cast, vibrant Saturday Morning Cartoon animation, and interesting storyline of Mark coming to terms with his heritage, there is so much potential here, but the writers seem content focusing on poorly developed subplots. Guys, the show is called Invincible. Let’s focus on his story…

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AMARÚ

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Invincible continues to be one of the best comic book adaptations out today because it takes both its comic and grounded aspects seriously. There is fun and action and gore and tropes, but that never gets in the way of telling authentic stories to which people can connect. Season Two: Part One tackles themes of grief, guilt, and responsibility through multiple storylines, but still keeps its sights on Mark Grayson’s (Steven Yeun) main journey. This is all uplifted by a tremendous voice cast who brings every emotion to life in this true comic series.

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PAIGE

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Although the first four episodes of Invincible‘s second season are packed with action, drama, and violence, not to mention being a solid continuation of the stellar first season, the overall structure of these episodes doesn’t pack a big enough punch storywise. Following a rocky start, it eventually finds its footing with a shocking reveal in the mid-season finale, but it takes too long to get what we were all longing for. With that said, this series is still as bold as they come, and it remains one of the better superhero shows on TV.

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CALEB

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I’m mixed on the first half of Invincible‘s second season. The animation and characters are still great, but the narrative is off to a pretty jumbled start. The plotline revolving around the Graysons is heading in an interesting direction, but the show is having trouble fitting in the other subplots. Typical shows have an A plot and a B plot, but Invincible seems to be hopping from A to B to C, D, E, etc. There’s definitely a lot going on, but thankfully most of it’s good. I’m still excited to continue, I’m just hoping the rest of the season focuses up a bit.

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